When more than 1300 students were surveyed by foundary10, they found that there was a high level of excitement for learning through VR. Among those surveyed, the greatest area of interest lay in using VR for Science Education (44% of respondents).

After trying out VR in their schools, fewer students wanted to use it for gaming than before; instead, they preferred to use it to experience the past, something new in the present, or seeing something the future might yet deliver. This data shows that students’ desire for learning can grow through the use of VR.

One of the benefits of VR is the immersive way it delivers content. Of those students surveyed, almost 60 percent did not have their “sense of immersion” broken during their time with a VR headset on. Speaking to the user readiness of VR, only around 5 percent of the breaks in immersion were due to the technology itself.

Also of note:

  • An overwhelming majority of students felt that VR would better help them understand places
  • Over half of the students felt that VR would help them to better understand people

There is something else that the data shows though – VR developers/creators have a responsibility to develop content they are knowledgeable about and think about how their creations will be used because students expect this of them. The fact that VictoryVR’s suite of science products is based around the NGSS is a great example of this.

Overall, this is further evidence that there is a demand for VR learning and a need for products like VictoryVR Science in schools.

 

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